Skip to content

Recent Articles

20
Jan

Bank of Canada maintains overnight rate target at 1/2 per cent

The Bank of Canada today announced that it is maintaining its target for the overnight rate at 1/2 per cent. The Bank Rate is correspondingly 3/4 per cent and the deposit rate is 1/4 per cent.

Uncertainty about the global outlook is undiminished, particularly with respect to policies in the United States. The Bank has made initial assumptions about prospective tax policies only, resulting in a modest upward revision to its US growth outlook. Overall, the global economy is strengthening largely as expected and prices of some commodities, including oil, have risen. The rapid back-up in global bond yields, partly reflecting market anticipation of US fiscal expansion, has pulled up Canadian yields relative to the October Monetary Policy Report (MPR).

In contrast to the United States, Canada’s economy continues to operate with material excess capacity. While employment growth has remained firm, indicators still point to significant slack in the labour market. The resource sector’s adjustment to past commodity price declines appears to be largely complete, but negative wealth and income effects will persist. Meanwhile, the Canadian dollar has strengthened along with the US dollar against other currencies, exacerbating ongoing competitiveness challenges and muting the outlook for exports. Consumption is expected to remain solid, while residential investment will be tempered by previously announced changes to housing finance rules and by mortgage rates that have risen in response to higher bond yields. Federal and provincial fiscal measures are still expected to support growth in 2017.

Bearing in mind the important assumptions embedded in its forecast, the Bank projects that Canada’s real GDP will grow by 2.1 per cent in both 2017 and 2018. This implies a return to full capacity around mid-2018, in line with October’s projection.

Inflation in Canada has been lower than anticipated since October, mainly because of declines in food prices. Measures of core inflation are below 2 per cent, reflecting material excess capacity in the economy. As consumer energy prices rise and the impact of lower food prices dissipates, inflation is expected to move close to the 2 per cent target in the months ahead and remain there throughout the projection horizon while excess capacity is being absorbed.

In the context of a projection that is largely unchanged, the Bank’s Governing Council judges that the current stance of monetary policy is still appropriate and maintains the target for the overnight rate at 1/2 per cent. Governing Council will continue to assess the impact of ongoing developments, mindful of the significant uncertainties weighing on the outlook.

Information note

The next scheduled date for announcing the overnight rate target is 1 March 2017. The next full update of the Bank’s outlook for the economy and inflation, including risks to the projection, will be published in the MPR on 12 April 2017.

Content Type(s): Press, Press Releases
16
Jun

8 Things to Be Aware of When Buying a Second Home

You can afford a second home, let us show you how!

Home

Home

Now that low interest Canadian mortgage rates are readily available, it seems like the perfect time to invest in a second home. Here’s what you should know before purchasing a second property.

Things to Learn About Before Buying a Second Home

1) Do your research.

You will need to resist the urge to buy a home because you want a getaway. Research the properties, area, and low mortgage rate options beforehand. This is an investment, not just a vacation.

2) Think long-term.

Take into account the style of home that would suit your family’s needs. You should consider proximity and what you plan to do while you’re there.

3) Visit the area.

Have a look at the area when it’s off-season and put in the time to speak with the people who live there year round. This will help you get a better understanding of the neighborhood.

4) Determine the style of home.

A home requires maintenance regularly, whereas a condo requires that you pay another person to look after it.

5) Shop around for the best mortgage rate.

Your objective should not be loyalty to your bank, but rather getting the most suitable deal.

6) Calculate the extra expenses.

From insurance and maintenance to taxes and repairs, you must consider the additional costs.

7) Consider sharing ownership.

Speak with your siblings, friends, and coworkers. Sharing a vacation property could help create a more feasible investment. Just be careful; mixing business with personal relationship may be difficult. Be certain that you aren’t casual about the deal and compose formal contracts.

8) Make the most of tax benefits.

Did you know you don’t have to pay taxes on rental income if your home is only rented out for no more than 15 days a year? Speak with your bank to get more information about tax loopholes concerning your new property.

16
Jun

A Few Things to Ask Your Mortgage Broker

There are no silly questions.

Ask Your Mortgage Broker

Ask Your Mortgage Broker

Listed below are a variety of questions to think about when speaking to your mortgage broker:

How long have you been working in the mortgage industry?

Years of experience is essential when it pertains to taking care of challenging mortgages.

What type of education or licensing do you have?

You need to confirm that your mortgage broker is licensed by consulting the Canadian Association of Accredited Mortgage Professionals.

On what do you base your suggestions?

You should make sure that they are providing recommendations for the right reasons. A mortgage broker works for you, and nobody else.

Are there any special conditions that apply to this deal?

Bear in mind any undisclosed costs or unfavorable conditions attached to a no-frills low mortgage rate.

What fees/costs are connected with the rate you have estimated me?

Do not let concealed costs creep up on you. Regularly ask your mortgage broker to break out any charges and fees so you are appropriately notified.

Can I please see the lender’s letter of commitment?

If you are assured a certain rate, be sure to request a letter from the lender verifying that the reviewed rate is undoubtedly locked in.

What is your area of expertise?

Brokers typically facilitate more loans of one form than another. If you are} purchasing a home, make certain you are dealing with a residential expert.

Are you affiliated with any mortgage associations?

Membership to some mortgage associations can possibly be a sign of the broker’s oath to provide} the best Canadian mortgage rate available.

Can you provide me with references?

Ask for names of current clients or real estate agents with whom they have actually worked.

A combination of extensive research and appropriate inquiry should certainly assist you to narrow down your pool of prospective mortgage brokers for the best mortgage rate.

16
Jun

Additional Costs of Buying a Home

Plan for these unanticipated costs when creating your budget.

Understanding Mortgage Costs

Understanding Mortgage Costs

A number of first time homebuyers are often shocked when they see the total cost of their home purchase, including the additional expenses, on closing day. Here’s a list of a few of the “hidden” expenditures you should expect to pay.

Land Survey

Despite the fact that most lenders may agree to the existing property survey, depending on when it was last conducted, it might be necessary to have another survey completed.

Home Inspection

The majority of lenders will request a home inspection, but even if they don’t, it’s worth the peace of mind to obtain another one.

Insurance

If you are applying for a high-ratio Canadian mortgage rate (with a down payment of less than 20 % of the purchase price), your lender will require you to purchase mortgage default insurance. While mortgage default insurance provides protection for the lender, you may wish to consider the mortgage rate life insurance for your own protection.

Legal Fees

Your lawyer will do a title search, register and prepare your low mortgage rate, and prepare the title deed.

Land Transfer

Land transfer tax must be paid by everyone who purchases property in Canada.

HST (harmonized sales tax)

HST was put into effect in July of 2010 in Ontario and British Columbia, HST (Harmonized Sales Tax) is applied to the purchase price of all new homes.

Appraisal

Your lender will only lend you a percentage of either the appraised market value of your home, or the home’s purchase price– often, the lesser of the two.

Unsure of how these additional costs will impact your home purchase? A mortgage broker can help. Contact a FamilyLending.ca mortgage specialist today.